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VERITAS Cluster Training

Veritas Cluster Server Syllabus
1. Getting acquainted with Clustering
1.1. What is a cluster?
1.2. What is a VCS cluster?
1.3. Detecting Failure
1.4. Switchover and failover

2. Understanding cluster components
2.1. Resources
2.1.1. Resource dependencies
2.1.2. Resource categories
2.2. Service groups
2.2.1. Types of service groups
2.2.2. The cluster service group
2.3. Agents
2.3.1. The agent framework
2.3.2. Agent Operators
2.3.3. Agent Classifications
2.4. Attributes
2.4.1. Attribute data types
2.4.2. Attribute dimensions
2.4.3. Types of attributes
2.4.4. Keywords/reserved words

3. Cluster control, communication and membership
3.1. High-Availability daemon (HAD)
3.2. Low latency transport (LLT)
3.3. Group membership service/atomic broadcast (GAB)
3.4. Inter-node communication
3.5. Intra-node communication
3.6. Low priority link
3.7. Disk heartbeats (GABDISK)
3.8. Jeopardy
3.8.1. Jeopardy conditions
3.8.2. Examples of jeopardy and network partitions

4. Configuration Concepts
4.1. The VCS configuration language
4.2. The main.cf file
4.2.1. Include Clauses
4.2.2. Cluster definition
4.2.3. System definition
4.2.4. Service group definition
4.2.5. Resource dependency clause
4.3. The tyes.cf file
4.4. Managing the VCS configuration file: the hacf utility
4.4.1. Verifying a configuration

4.4.2. Loading a configuration
4.4.3. Dumping a running configuration
4.4.4. Multiple versions of .cf Files

5. Putting the pieces together
5.1. Initial configuration
5.2. The main.cf for a two-node asymmetric NFS cluster
5.3. Configuring application service groups using application wizard.

6. Cluster topologies
6.1. Basic failover configurations
6.1.1. Asymmetric or active/passive configuration
6.1.2. Symmetric or active/active configuration
6.1.3. N-to-1 configuration
6.2. Advanced failover configurations
6.2.1. N+1 configuration
6.2.2. N-to-N configuration

7. VCS user privilege model
7.1. VCS user privileges
7.2. User privileges for CLI and Cluster shell commands

8. Administering VCS through command line
8.1. VCS environment variables
8.2. Starting VCS
8.3. Stopping VCS
8.3.1. Stopping VCS without –force option
8.3.2. Additional considerations for stopping VCS

8.4. Changing the configuration mode
8.4.1. Setting the configuration to read/write
8.4.2. Setting the configuration to read-only
8.5. Managing cluster users
8.5.1. Adding a user
8.5.2. Modifying a user
8.5.3. Deleting a user
8.5.4. Assigning and removing user privileges
8.5.5. Displaying a user
8.6. Querying VCS
8.6.1. Querying service groups
8.6.2. Querying resource types
8.6.3. Querying resources
8.6.4. Querying agents
8.6.5. Querying systems
8.6.6. Querying clusters
8.6.7. Querying status
8.7. Administering service groups
8.8. Administering resource types
8.9. Administering resources
8.10. Administering systems
8.11. Administering clusters
8.12. Backup up and restoring VCS configuration files
8.12.1. Creating snapshots
8.12.2. Displaying snapshot information
8.12.3. Updating the snapshots
8.12.4. Hasnap –d diff
8.12.5. Exporting the snapshots
8.12.6. Modifying the snapshot list
8.12.7. Hasnap –exclude
8.12.8. Deleting the snapshots

9. Controlling VCS behaviour
9.1. VCS behavior on resource faults
9.2. VCS behavior diagrams
9.2.1. Scenario: resource with critical parent faults
9.2.2. Scenario: resource with non-critical parent faults
9.3. Controlling VCS behavior at the service group level
9.3.1. Controlling failover on service group or system faults
9.3.2. Controlling clean behavior on resource faults
9.3.3. Controlling fault propagation
9.4. Controlling VCS behavior at the resource level
9.4.1. Attributes to remember
9.4.2. VCS behavior when an online resource faults
9.4.3. VCS behavior after a resource is declared faulted
9.5. Disabling resources
9.5.1. When to disable a resource
9.5.2. Limitations
9.5.3. How Disabled resources affect group states
9.6. Clearing resources in the ADMIN_WAIT state

10. Troubleshooting VCS startup
10.1. Troubleshooting VCS startup
10.2. Troubleshooting service groups
10.3. Troubleshooting resources
10.4. System states
10.5. Examples of system state transitions

11. Performance Considerations
11.1. How cluster components affect performance
11.2. Kernel components (GAB and LLT)
11.3. The VCS engine “HAD”
11.4. The impact of agents
11.5. Booting a cluster system
11.6. Bringing a resource online
11.7. Taking a resource offline
11.8. Bringing a service group online
11.9. Detecting resource failure
11.10. Detecting system failure
11.11. Detecting network link failure
11.12. Time taken for a service group switch
11.13. Time taken for a service group failover
11.14. CPU binding of HAD
11.15. Monitoring CPU usage

 

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